New generation of medicine for patients: IChemE Biotechnology Award Winner 2019

Addressing the need to generate new medicines and treatments for patients at a faster pace was something that UK consortium group – CPI, UCB Celltech, Lonza Pharma and Biotech, Horizon Discovery, Sphere Fluidics, and Alcyomics, have been developing over the past four years and earned them the IChemE Global Award 2019 in the Biotechnology Award category.

“If you involve chemical engineers earlier, you can get more manufacturable solutions earlier. It’s having that translational mindset in the project from an early stage, which makes a massive difference.”

The project incorporated various sectors of the biopharmaceutical industry together and working as team help advance the production and delivery of medication to patients more efficiently.

Hear more about the project in this video:

If you have what it takes, why not enter the IChemE Global Awards 2020 now:
https://www.icheme.org/globalawards

Entries are now open until 26 June 2020.

This video was produced by CMA Video.

Five chemical engineering research stories from July 2016

To help you stay up-to-date with the latest achievements from the chemical engineering research community here is our monthly installment with some of the latest stories.

Here are five stories of amazing chemical engineering research and innovation:

Making dirty water drinkable
glass of waterEngineers from Washington University in St. Louis have found a way to use graphene oxide sheets to transform dirty water into drinking water. “We hope that for countries where there is ample sunlight, such as India, you’ll be able to take some dirty water, evaporate it using our material, and collect fresh water,” said Srikanth Singamaneni, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science.

The new approach combines bacteria-produced cellulose and graphene oxide to form a bi-layered biofoam. “The properties of this foam material that we synthesized has characteristics that enhances solar energy harvesting. Thus, it is more effective in cleaning up water,” said Pratim Biswas, the Lucy and Stanley Lopata Professor and chair of the Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering.

Continue reading Five chemical engineering research stories from July 2016